Can you Wash DFS Sofa Covers?

Can you wash DFS sofa covers? Yes, you can! But let’s first talk about what they are made of. Recliners and sofas are manufactured in a variety of ways. Many out there claim to be waterproof or water-resistant – the problem is, there isn’t an official way to test it, which makes it hard for consumers to really know what they’re getting.

First off, make sure that your piece was manufactured by using a coating process (there will be either a label or tag on the item itself). If not, chances are it can still get stained – but at least you won’t have any problems with peeling later on down the line. So how do you know if your sofa or recliner uses a coating process?

Easy enough – just check. Look underneath the cushions and see if you can find the zipper tags from the manufacturing of your piece. That’s it! If you can, awesome, they use a coating process – and you’re in business to wash them. But don’t worry if not – there are still a few things you can try.

Cleaning:

It’s all about prepping before anything else. You need to make sure that any dirt, body oils or other pollutants have been removed from the surface of your furniture before you jump in with water (discussed below). This will ensure optimum results when cleaning your upholstery later on down the line (you want to try and remove as much initial grime so that it doesn’t come back when you’re trying to clean it).

Before washing a DFS sofa, here are the steps I would recommend

Remove cushions from the frame:

You can do this easily by checking under the seat for buttons or clips – they will undo them all – and then give them a good shake-out.

They should unzip right off. If you have more than one cushion, do each separately. Place soft cushions with hair or fur in direct sunlight first, so that they can be cleaned of oils, dirt, dust, and other pollutants before treating them.

Examine your sofa closely. When the sun is out (you can also use direct light from indoors if you don’t have access to the sun, but it will take longer), if you find stains that won’t hold in a cleaning solution, use a towel or rag and quarter-warm water with detergent. I would suggest Murphy’s oil soap for this kind of job:

Follow up with freshwater rinse after washing.

If necessary, apply more soap as needed. Be sure that all of the soap is rinsed off before proceeding to the next step.

If your couch has feet on it, they can be easily removed:

They just pull out with effort (be prepared for it!) You want these off so you can wash them! Apply 1 cup of white vinegar into a warm/hot water container. While vinegar is an acid, it won’t harm the fabric.

However, if you have a piece of furniture made from cotton or any material that, with time and wear, may shrink (cotton and wool are the most common), do not use vinegar on them.

For these kinds of fabrics especially, I would suggest using an ice cube tray to put hot water in instead of regular water (and putting 2 trays in the freezer overnight) –cold water always shrinks!

Dip your rags into this solution

Swab away at your couch! This will lift off old dirt/stains. Do not scrub too hard: just swipe gently in the direction of fiber growth as shown below:

If you happen to be washing leather furniture: this explains it all! I am not positive that this would stain fabric. However be careful with any cleaning agent: always test a small area first to be safe, or better yet call an expert (professional cleaner) for advice as this article is meant for general information only and not professional assistance

Also, avoid using any household products on the leather surface of your furniture :

There are two types of liquid soap: Soapsuds detergents have surfactants that cause dirt to “bead” on the fiber surface–very effective but hard on fibers; soaps contain fatty acids which emulsify fats and oils. They work well at getting rid of oily marks but can discolor white fabrics if allowed to dry.

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